How to Build Your Own Butcher Block

Not long ago I shared how I constructed this kitchen island for my mother. As guaranteed, today I will demonstrate to you how I fabricated the butcher piece table best for it. I backpedaled and forward, worrying about whether to assemble a butcher piece table best or to get one. When I say get one, I mean my mother. She obtained the greater part of the materials. I was the talented “fly by the seat of my jeans” work. I hunt high and down and out a shoddy butcher piece ledge that would fit the determinations I required, however they were insane costly! I considered doing wide boards, yet my significant other cautioned me that they may twist before long and that little boards were ideal. It wasn’t until the point when I saw this instructional exercise on Sawdust and Embryos that it at long last clicked.

The most widely recognized wood in butcher squares is maple as a result of its hardness. I had wanted to utilize maple, however when I went to my nearby Woodworkers Source, I happened to see the knotty birch. It is somewhat gentler than hard maple, yet at the same time a hard wood and when I talked about it with one of the workers, we both concurred it would be a fine decision for the island top. Best of all, it was a large portion of the cost! I picked my loads up and had another worker plane and tear the loads up down into reasonable sticks for me.

My wood was planed at 1 3/4″ thickness and I had it ripped into 1 1/2″ sticks.  When I got home, I cut all of my long sticks into smaller pieces.  I had to cut out some knots (they don’t call it knotty alder for nothing), but that gave me the random patterns I was looking for.  I turned the wood pieces on their sides so my slats were 1 1/2″ thick and 1 3/4″ wide.

FURNITURE PROJECTS, PROJECTS

 

Earlier this week I shared how I built this kitchen island for my mom.  As promised, today I’m going to show you how I built the butcher block table top for it.  I went back and forth, fretting over whether to build a butcher block table top or to buy one.  When I say buy one, I mean my mom.  She purchased all of the materials.  I was the  skilled  “fly by the seat of my pants” labor.  I searched high and low for a cheap butcher block countertop that would fit the specifications I needed, but they were crazy expensive!  I thought about doing wide planks, but my husband warned me that they might warp after a while and that small planks were best.  It wasn’t until I saw this tutorial on Sawdust and Embryos that it finally clicked.

The most common wood in butcher blocks is maple because of its hardness.  I had planned to use maple, but when I went to my local Woodworkers Source, I happened to see the knotty alder.  It is a little softer than hard maple, but still a hard wood and when I discussed it with one of the employees, we both agreed it would be a fine choice for the island top.  The best part is that it was half the price!  I chose my boards and had another employee plane and rip the boards down into manageable sticks for me.

IMG_1454

My wood was planed at 1 3/4″ thickness and I had it ripped into 1 1/2″ sticks.  When I got home, I cut all of my long sticks into smaller pieces.  I had to cut out some knots (they don’t call it knotty alder for nothing), but that gave me the random patterns I was looking for.  I turned the wood pieces on their sides so my slats were 1 1/2″ thick and 1 3/4″ wide.

 

I got all of my clamps lined up and went to work.  I used Titebond III to glue the pieces together.  It is food safe, so a good choice for something like this.  I turned the boards to the side I wanted to glue and started laying it on.  I don’t know if it was the high 80s temps, but the glue formed a skin pretty fast on me, so I would work in two rows at a time and then stick them together.  Squeezing a bead of glue and then using a foam roller to spread it out works really well.  Be sure that if you have short pieces to glue those ends together too.

Thanks so much to Concrete Contractors in Orlando, Concrete Contractors in Sarasota and Concrete Contractors in Memphis for sponsoring my blog!

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